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Posts for category: Skin Condition

By St. Mary's Medical Clinic
December 01, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Varicose Veins  

Many people are bothered by the small, unsightly clusters of purple, red and blue veins that commonly appear on the legs. These blemishes are called spider and varicose veins. Factors that lead to the formation of these veins include heredity, gender, and pregnancy. Prolonged standing, obesity, hormones, and physical trauma may also contribute to the development of varicose veins. Varicose Veins

In addition to the visual appearance of the veins, many people may experience the following symptoms:

  • Leg pain
  • Leg fatigue or heaviness
  • Burning sensations in the leg
  • Swelling/throbbing in the leg
  • Tenderness surrounding the veins

Varicose veins may remain merely a cosmetic issue or can progress to more serious health complications. Delaying treatment may cause leg discoloration, swelling and ulceration, or predispose to blood clots. It’s important to consult your regular physician when you first notice signs of varicose veins.  

For patients troubled by the appearance of their veins, there is help. Varicose veins can easily be removed with the help of a dermatologist. A time-tested treatment, sclerotherapy is a simple, safe, and effective non-surgical procedure used to treat unwanted varicose veins.  

Sclerotherapy diminishes the appearance of varicose veins by injecting a “sclerosing agent” into target veins to shrink the vessels and minimize their appearance. While a specific treatment plan can only be determined following a consultation with your dermatologist, most patients notice a significant reduction, if not total elimination, of their unwanted veins over the treatment period.

Sclerotherapy has been used for generations by dermatologists to help patients eliminate spider and varicose veins. Sclerotherapy can enhance your appearance and improve your self-confidence. Visit your dermatologist for an initial consultation and find out if you are a good candidate.

By St. Mary's Medical Clinic
July 03, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Rosacea  

Rosacea is a chronic skin condition of the face that affects an estimated 16 million Americans. Because rosacea is frequently misdiagnosed and confused with acne, sunburn or eye irritation, a large percentage of people suffering from rosacea fail to seek medical help due to lack of awareness.  It’s important to understand the warning signs of rosacea and need for treatment to make the necessary lifestyle changes and prevent the disorder from becoming progressively severe.

Although the exact cause of rosacea is unknown, you may be more susceptible to rosacea if:

  • You are fair-skinned
  • You blush easily
  • You are female
  • You have a family history of rosacea
  • You are between the ages of 30 and 50

A frequent source of social embarrassment, for many people rosacea affects more than just the face. Rosacea is a chronic skin disease, which means it lasts for a lifetime. Learning what triggers your rosacea is an important way to reduce flare-ups and manage symptoms. This may include avoiding stress, too much sunlight, heavy exercise, extreme temperatures and certain foods or beverages.

What Are the Symptoms of Rosacea?

Rosacea frequently causes the cheeks to have a flushed or red appearance. The longer rosacea goes untreated, the higher the potential for permanent redness of the cheeks, nose and forehead. Symptoms of rosacea will not be the same for every person. Common symptoms include:

  • Facial burning and stinging
  • Facial flushing and blush that evolves to persistent redness
  • Redness on the cheeks, nose, chin or forehead
  • Small, visible broken blood vessels on the face
  • Acne-like breakouts on the face
  • Watery or irritated eyes

If you recognize any of the warning signs of rosacea, visit your dermatologist for a proper diagnosis. A dermatologist will examine your skin for common warning signs and tailor a treatment plan for your unique condition. Treatment will vary for each individual, ranging from topical medicine, antibiotics and lasers or light treatment. While there is currently no cure, with proper management patients can learn how to avoid triggers, prevent flare-ups and manage their condition to live a healthy, active life.

By St. Mary's Medical Clinic
June 01, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Psoriasis  

PsoriasisPsoriasis is a common, chronic and often frustrating skin condition that causes skin scaling, inflammation, redness and irritation. The exact cause is unknown, but psoriasis is thought to be caused by an overactive immune system, which causes the skin to form inflamed, scaly lesions. These patches of thick, red skin may be itchy and painful. They are often found on the elbows and knees, but can also form on the scalp, lower back, face and nails.

Symptoms of psoriasis are different for every person and can vary in intensity over time. Some people may even go months or years without symptoms before flare-ups return. Symptoms of psoriasis can manifest in many ways, including:

  • Rough, scaly skin
  • Cracks on fingertips
  • Simple tasks are painful, such as tying your shoe
  • Brown, uneven nails
  • Flaky skin
  • Joint pain or aching
  • Severe itching

The onset of psoriasis can occur at any age, although it most often occurs in adults. The disease is non-contagious and is thought to be genetic. Because psoriasis is a persistent, systemic autoimmune disease, people with psoriasis will have it for a lifetime. Most people who suffer from psoriasis can still lead healthy, active lives with proper management and care. 

Coping with Psoriasis: Your Dermatologist can Help

Currently, there is no cure for psoriasis, but with the help of your dermatologist, you can learn how to cope with the condition, reduce psoriasis symptoms and keep outbreaks under control for an improved quality of life. Treatment depends on how serious the psoriasis is, the type of psoriasis and how the patient responds to certain treatments.

By St. Mary's Medical Clinic
March 30, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Eczema  

EczemaEczema, also called “dermatitis,” refers to several different rash-like conditions where the skin is inflamed, red and irritated. The most severe and long-lasting type of eczema is atopic dermatitis. During a flare-up, the skin becomes extremely red, itchy and scaly. This skin condition can be widespread, or confined to only a few areas on the body.

Eczema is not contagious, although if you have a family history of eczema, your risk for the disease increases. Generally, atopic dermatitis affects infants or young children and may last until the child reaches adulthood.

The appearance and symptoms for atopic dermatitis will vary for each case. Intense itching is the most common sign of eczema, which can lead to severe discomfort and even loss of sleep. Other common symptoms of eczema include:

  • Dry, red and extremely itchy patches of skin
  • Cracked, inflamed and scaly skin
  • Small bumps or blisters that ooze and weep
  • In infants, the rash generally appears on the cheeks and around the mouth

Eczema outbreaks are caused by an overreaction of your skin’s immune system to environmental and emotional triggers, such as temperature, chemicals, dust, mold or stress. While there is currently no cure, eczema sufferers can practice self-care at home to help reduce flare-ups. Lifestyle adjustments are the best line of defense in controlling all types of eczema. Goals of treatment include reducing inflammation, decreasing risk of infection and alleviating the itch. To minimize symptoms and outbreaks:

  • Moisturize every day to prevent dryness and cracking.
  • Limit contact with irritants, such as soaps, clothing, jewelry, foods and detergents.
  • Avoid sudden changes in temperatures as overheating and sweating are common triggers of flare-ups.
  • Reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Minimize exposure to mold, pollens and animal dander.
  • Opt for cotton, loose-fitting clothes and avoid wool and other rough materials.

Treatment for eczema begins with a proper diagnosis from your dermatologist. If you are diagnosed with eczema, your dermatologist can explain your type of eczema and can work with you to tailor a treatment plan that meets your individual needs to effectively manage the symptoms.

By St. Mary's Medical Clinic
March 29, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: warts  

If you have a wart find out how they happen and what your options are for treating it.warts

Warts are completely benign growths that when they appear won’t often cause children or adults much of an issue. However, there are some instances in which warts can be in rather embarrassing or uncomfortable spots. In this case, our doctor, Dr. Awa Igbinadolor in Monroe, NC, has options for treating your wart or warts. Find out more about warts and what your treatment options are.

Warts will often just go away on their own, but it takes times. In fact, it can take several years for a wart to go away, so if you are finding your wart unattractive or uncomfortable you do have other ways to get rid of it more quickly.

Over-the-Counter Products

You can head to your local drugstore and check out the different wart products available to you. Sometimes they have options that are similar to what you will get from your skin doctor except they aren’t always as fast acting. After all, your dermatologist has received extensive training to be able to use products safely and effectively. The medications used won’t be as strong if you find them over-the-counter, but they may still do the trick.

Seeing Your Doctor

If the wart is constantly irritated or if your child has one on their face this warrants a trip to visit our dermatologist for treatment. Don’t try to treat these warts at home, as this could just irritate your skin and make things worse. If you have diabetes or peripheral arterial disease, you’ll also want to visit us right away so that we can provide you with the proper wart treatment.

There are a few different ways that we treat warts including:

  • Cryotherapy: Freezing the wart is a popular treatment and one that works well. It’s relatively painless and only takes a few minutes to complete.
  • Medication: We may prescribe certain medications that contain ingredients like retinoid, which help remove layers of the skin to shed the wart.
  • Chemical peels: There are some types of chemical peels that can help kill and safely remove the wart. Common chemical peels include ones that contain glycolic acid or tretinoin.
  • Surgery: In some instances, we will perform laser surgery or use a scalpel to remove the wart.

If you are dealing with painful or unsightly warts then it’s time you reached out to your doctor, Dr. Awa Igbinadolor in Monroe, NC, to find out what to do. Not everyone wants to wait for a wart to go away on its own. Find out what treatment is the best one for you.